Learning Visualisation:
(A story with a British background)


 Let’s start with the summary or the OBJECTIVE of this exercise: 

SUMMARY:

It is not important WHAT picture you have, as long as you have one.You can weave it into a story, but you don’t have to. And many/most/all  of the pictures have absolutely nothing to do with the meaning of the word to be remembered. 

ð You do NOT need to know the meaning of the word.

ð You do need to have a picture.   


See this story in your mind’s eye: 

Norman Schwartzkopf (US General: Desert Storm) is just coming out of Buckingham Palace and stormin’ (his nickname: Storming Norman) into a Harvey Norman shop, and he is creating havoc in there.

He holds a plant in his hands, and a girl called Janet is clinging on to the plant (you might make certain elements in the story bigger or smaller, just as you see fit and just as it seems appropriate to make it ‘unusual’).

And Norman gets really mad, and starts throwing (maybe a bit like bowling) that plant – Janet still on/in the plant – down a lane. And this lane has a plaster cast (just like when you have a broken leg).

And now the lane is changing into a Yorkie bar; all that lane so chocolatty: you can see the chocolate, and you can smell it, and you (almost) can taste the Yorkie chocolate.

However now the Yorkie bar is coming to life, like in a cartoon: with arms and legs and head, and gets mad and rams into a Tudor houseThe Tudor house is in rubble, dust everywhere, and if you want: (like in a cartoon) the Tudor house and Yorkie bar are fighting.

And out of all that rubble steps your friend Stewart (or any famous Stewart: Jackie Stewart or James Stewart or any Stewart/Stuart that you know). If really no Stuart comes to mind: can you see a Stewardess? Have some fun with this one.

However this Stewardess is in a bad state as she has the worst hang-over that you can imagine. She is totally drunk; and she has a bottle of whiskey in her hand, and you can feel this terrible hang-over.

But despite this hang-over she tries to climb onto a surfing board, and she goes wind-surfing. 


Now that was a strange story.

However: I just told you the British Royal Families from 1066 to the current one. 

The names of the Royal British Families are (starting in 1066):

  • Norman
  • Plantagenet
  • Lancaster
  • York
  • Tudor
  • Stewart
  • Hanover
  • Windsor


Let’s start all over again:

Starting at Buckingham PalaceOut comes Norman Schwartzkopf: That is the first house: the Normans. Just to clarify: Mr. Schwartzkopf has nothing to do with the Normans, however he serves nicely as a picture. And that is what we want. 

He holds a plant with Janet on/in it: the next house is: PlantagenetI admit: it is written in a different way, however that is how it sounds, and that is good enough to deliver a memorable picture. 

He bowls this down a lane that is in (plaster) cast: the next house is: Lancaster.

Which changes into a Yorkie bar: the next house is: YorkNow: the chocolate of course has nothing to do with the Royal house, however, Yorkie is very close to York, and therefore will do just fine as a picture. 

This rams into a house, a Tudor house. Voila, that the next family: Tudor. 

Out of the rubble comes either any Stewart/Stuart or a a stewardess: that’s the next house: Stuart. 

The next one is a crafty one. This stewardess has a hang-over, which does sound like Hanover. This is the next house. 

And the stewardess is still in the picture, as she tries a bit of wind-surfing; which may sound like the current Royal house: Windsor.  


SUMMARY:

It is not important WHAT picture you have, as long as you have one.You can weave it into a story, but you don’t have to. And many/most/all  of the pictures have absolutely nothing to do with the meaning of the word to be remembered. 


ð You do NOT need to know the meaning of the word.

ð You do need to have a picture.  



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